#41 – Richard Redlefsen

Richard Redlefsen is someone I saw for the first time a few years back at the UMAE where he was applying his demo makeup on the PPI stand.

What was of note for me was how particular and precise everything was. Care was taken at every turn, and it struck me that the amount of effort that takes must come from a deep well.

So it was a great pleasure to sit and chat with the man himself, and I could ask if he thought of this about himself and if we could pick apart where that comes from. As you’ll hear, Richard had a career as a dancer before he embarked on makeup, and his training was thorough. I think that experience and also working for a makeup brand such as Lancôme meant his work doesn’t start and stop with bits of rubber!

Check it out for yourself below. Follow Richard on his Instagram to see just how versatile this chap really is.


Stream or download below, we are also on Spotify, iTunes, Soundcloud…wherever you get podcasts! Subscribe in your podcatcher to make sure you don’t miss the latest episodes!


 

Check out a brief selection of the range Richard covers.

A Devil mask sculpt completed recently for Immortal Masks.

Claudia Alta (Lady ‘Bird’ Johnson) wrap-around prosthetic sculpt ready to mould.

Zombie makeup on Eva Minaeva for TUSH magazine.

Phantom makeup from Monsterpalooza 2016.

A 1920s beauty makeup on Sarah Sokolovic from the NBC show Timeless. Sarah plays Grace Humiston (the first female Special Assistant United States Attorney). Makeup was usually done by Peter DeOliveira and Richard filled in on this day. It’s quite a responsibility to fill in seamlessly on a show with established looks.

Another beauty makeup on Bianca Lopez from NBC show Timeless. Makeup by Richard Redlefsen. Debbie Zoller makeup dept head.


We are on the lookout for your stories of people wanted way too much of something for a whole lot of nothing. 

We chat about a Facebook post which got a lot of people’s back up, as a freelancer or anyone with a creative spark, you may have been approached to do something which gradually expands into a lot of somethings, and payment is strangely far from the table.

Email us with your stories, screenshots or anything regarding that. We’d love to do a post focussing on that and read some of the best ones out, and formulate an appropriate response to arm you if you find yourself in that position of feeling bad for wanting fair compensation.

Email us direct at stuartandtodd@gmail.com
Facebook page at Battles With Bits Of Rubber

If you enjoy this, PLEASE help us grow by telling someone about us and posting on social media! We had a lovely message from Charlotte Annice Spruch who mentioned the formula for finding your worth from a few episodes back on a Facebook group. Cheers Charlotte!

That kind of sharing is what helps us grow, and we get heard by the people who would be glad to find us!

Till next time!

– Stuart & Todd

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

#40 – Rick Baker

Rick Baker knows a thing or two about making stuff in rubber.

It’s also fair to say he knows a thing or two about the digital world too, as he has been mixing the two for a while.

In 2015, when it was announced that Rick was to close his shop, the FX world was stunned and the bell tolled once again for the end of all practical effects as people speculated the end of live-action anything.

There was a Vice article at the time which claimed (again) the ‘CGI was killing the industry’ which, if you were knee deep in rubber and working crazy hours trying to get stuff done for a show like I and many others were was hard to take seriously.

Now the dust has settled, I was so stoked to get a chance to sit and talk to the man himself and see what he was doing with himself now he was out of the industry. He was after possibly the most well known and most respected inspirations working at the time, so what were we to do now he had hung up his makeup brushes?

The answer? Keep on making things.

Simply put, what has happened since Rick retired is that he is still working and still developing. He has worked on things he wanted to work on make them the way he wanted to make them. He has pushed into mixing up practical and digital techniques in both digital sculpting and 3D printing, post production elements as well as being able to indulge in some of the most fun Halloween makeups we have seen so far.

Following Rick on Instagram (@therickbaker), you will see a man working harder than ever but this time, he only has to please himself rather than juggle a board of producers. No budget fights or sudden changes of direction to steal away the efforts so far. It is, frankly, amazing. If you have been inspired by the Rick Baker of Thriller, American Werewolf and Nutty Professor, then I am pleased to say your inspiration is still there better than ever.

Rick has been working on a scale model scene from the 1932 Frankenstein movie.
It really is very cool.

I particularly wanted to talk to Rick about this move into the newer technologies. We all love to talk about American Werewolf of course, but that ground has been covered before, and I wanted to talk to him about what is going on now. As you’ll hear, Rick was an early adopter so it really isn’t that ‘new’ after all.

As therapy for me, it totally settled my own fears on digital work and I am happy to say I am flying along with ZBrush, CAD and 3D printing now myself. I finally lost the fear and found the love for it. Only took me ten years.

Thanks, Rick!


Stream or download below, we are also on Spotify, iTunes, Soundcloud…wherever you get podcasts! Subscribe in your podcatcher to make sure you don’t miss the latest episodes!


Thanks again for listening, and if you would like to support us, as ever there is one thing you can do that helps more than anything – tell someone else about the podcast! Share this on social media and tell us how we are doing!

You can email us here direct at stuartandtodd@gmail.com

We appreciate your attention!

– Stuart & Todd

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

#39 – Halloween, Harm & Rubber Chickens

Something that Don talked about passionately in our interview was how (mostly) young, creative people can be in a position to get taken advantage of. When working starting out, you are not likely to be handed a position of massive responsibility with large sums of money and heavy hitting clients.

So it stands to reason when the phone first rings, it’s likely to be a smaller production with little or no budget looking for some help and played right it can be a wonderful place to start.

In this episode, we chat about this with a word of warning and a method of understanding your worth so that if you find yourself in this position, you can check yourself and your fluctuating emotions against the empirical gauge of common sense.


Stream or download below, we are also on Spotify, iTunes, Soundcloud…wherever you get podcasts! Subscribe in your podcatcher to make sure you don’t miss the latest episodes!


Halloween Horrors

We also wax lyrical about plain dangerous Halloween makeups which we have seen. Every year, a plethora of inappropriate objects are attached to eyes and noses in an attempt to get likes and attention.

There isn’t anything wrong with that, unless of course actual harm can come about from doing so. Using sharp things on the skin is a no-no. In the latest Prosthetics Event and Prosthetics Magazine, Todd and I covered a safe way of doing one such gag.

Claire Golby kindly lent me face so I could slam a screwdriver into her eye. Kind of. No Claires were harmed in the making of this demo.

Yes, it is time-consuming and takes effort.

I realise it may not have looked that hard the on the gameshow ‘Face Off‘.  Also, not many people are looking to hire someone who is always seeking to do the bare minimum either, so if that upsets you, best keep walking, buttercup.


The prosthetics Event 2018

I had a great time, with four different stage spots throughout the day. One such highlight was chatting to Christopher Nelson who headed up the small team for the new Halloween movie. We chatted a lot about the act of making, how it feels to fail and how to address those sensations in order to keep going. We also talked about smashing in faces and bleeding gags, just your usual prosthetic get together chit-chat!

I also got to talk lenses with the team from Cantor Nissel who make lenses and eyes for both medical and theatrical uses. It was a real education, and something we will look into more in upcoming episodes.

Next year the show will be even bigger and better!


New Cap Plastic

Thanks to the Motion Picture FX guys for sending me a sample of their new BALDFX “CHIPS”. I tried it and loved it – so soft and flexible, it makes a great encapsulant for appliances as well as for bald caps.


So, the main course of this post and episode is to throw a spotlight on how to be aware of being taken advantage of when you are a creative desperate for a shot!

1 – You’re new here, right?

Ok, so you’re new to this. Maybe you have just left makeup school/a different career path or job/ made a new life for yourself but now the first opportunity comes along and you have nothing to compare yourself against to know what is expected of you. You don’t want to appear too harsh in case you scare them off, nor do you want to be a pushover.

Understand that we all must get by. Life costs money. Standing still and doing nothing costs you money. A great exercise is to sit down with a calculator, tot up all your outgoings for a year.

  • Add up your rent/mortagage payments, car, fuel, food, utilities, phone, computer, insurances and whatever else allows you to function for any given year.
  • Add it all up and divide that number by 365.
  • That number it gives you is how much it costs to stand still for one day.

You need to make at least that each day to break even and to be able to afford to come back tomorrow. You presumably need to make a profit, so that when you are sick, older or want a better set of circumstances, you will have accumulated enough to tide you over.

Using this is the starting point you can see that your time really shouldn’t ever be free. How much you can charge for your time depends on what you can offer the client. Remember, a client will only pay for the problems that you can solve for them.

This little thought experiment applies to most people, including the people who are asking you to do something for them. It maybe but the person who contacts you doesn’t have any creative experience and has no idea how much effort goes into something or how much material may cost and consequently places little value on what you may bring.  Part of your remit is to ensure you get what you need to be able to perform the tasks properly.

There are a couple of great files on the Neill Gorton Makeup FX 911 Facebook page which cover some good ground a freelancer should consider when making themselves available for work. (If you are not a memer, I would consider joining. It’s free and packed with great info)

2 – What do they need, and what do you need in order to do it?

If you’re new to the business and you have limited experience, then it is not reasonable for you to be expected to do incredibly complicated things beyond your ability. Very important therefore to have a clear accurate measure of what you can do and how you sit within the scale of ability. If people are hiring somebody do you do something for a very complicated involved project, then they should find somebody appropriately skilled and capable of doing this job.

If you know this is not you then you really should not take the job on in the first place. There’s no shame in turning down something that you know is beyond your ability because if you take it on any can’t do it it’s going to do everyone more harm than good. It’s important that you push yourself a little but not take on more than you can possibly do.

If you can do the job, you then need to make sure you have enough time and resources.

A lot of people feel bad about asking for money when doing a job.  Remember, we have established it costs money to stand still and do absolutely nothing at all. This being the case you will need to cover those costs and of course cover any materials you need to use or replace and be compensated for any time that you put towards the job.

Budgeting and working out how much a job costs comes with experience and the more you do it the more you know how you work and how quickly you can do things.

You will need to work out what your day rate is; that is the amount you should charge per day to cover your costs, plus whatever materials you need to acquire in order do the job.

It absolutely is not okay for you to pay for materials out of your own money. This is a business expense and needs to be covered by the production.

If the production on not willing to pay for the materials that you require to do the job then I would take that as a red flag right there and walk away. Keep in mind that no matter who does this job, they will have to get those materials. If you are afraid that asking for material costs will mean they will simply go elsewhere, consider the fact that whoever they get in will have to buy those materials also.

Make sure you have a clear understanding of what they need and what they are expecting from you. If what they are asking for and what they are offering you as compensation is unrealistic or untenable then there is good reason to decline the work. You could soften the blow by suggesting colleagues all friends or associates that may be able to help

Very often there is little to no budget for these things and it’s possible they simply can’t pay anything. I myself have done a few of these jobs in the past purely to gain experience, and to be motivated to produce things which I can then use to fill out my portfolio.

If you can get some kind of benefit from it whether it’s great photography, chance to work with an up and coming group of people, the experience or simply because it is fun then there those are good reasons and the benefits which can offset the trouble you go to. Just beware that you can’t continually do this because it simply will use you up.

3 – Feel good about walking away

It’s not uncommon for people to think that if they rock the boat by asking for things that they need, they will somehow sabotage their future and that the client has this amazing connection to the industry that they love.

This is all highly unlikely for one good reason.

If the client is such a big shot then why have they not simply gone to an established company and paid big bucks for the job to be done?

I’m guessing the reason they have asked somebody straight out of college or with little experience is because they cannot afford it or have no influence elsewhere to command such mighty favours.

This being the case it’s always pays to do a little bit of research on who is hiring you so that you can see what they have done before and what kind of calibre of work they have been responsible for. It also means you can figure out whether they are full of shit or not too.

Consider also what else this production is spending money on to have a good idea of where they are spending it. Do they have any celebrity names attached to the project? Are they filming in a major studio? Are they filming this using expensive cameras with expensive lenses and expensive lights? Do they have catering and location costs?

If the answer to any of these questions is yes then, there has been some money apportioned and it’s only reasonable that your minimum costs be met in order to pay for it.  If they’ve got money to do some of these things and are specifically withholding it from your department, there’s a good chance that this is just a predatory manoeuvre on their part to try and get something for nothing.

If you end up paying for materials out of your own pocket for any production, then you are no longer a makeup artist, but a partial financer of the production. A producer if you will. Think about that.

If you go in with your eyes wide open and you are aware that this is the case, and you can afford the time to do this for the joy of it or to get some experience … that’s perfectly acceptable. Just be aware of what your responsibilities are and make sure you are being treated fairly.

This is not to say that all such opportunities are there to screw people over, but if you apply some simple logical thought and can understand what the job is and where you fit into the equation, you can have a lot of fun learning your craft.



Stream or download below, we are also on Spotify, iTunes, Soundcloud…wherever you get podcasts! Subscribe in your podcatcher to make sure you don’t miss the latest episodes!



Thanks again for listening, and if you would like to support us, as ever there is one thing you can do that helps more than anything – tell someone else about the podcast! Share this on social media and tell us how we are doing!

You can email us here direct at stuartandtodd@gmail.com

We appreciate your attention!

– Stuart & Todd

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Ep #38 – Don Lanning part 2

We are back with more Don!

Even though I was there when we recorded, I still get a buzz hearing back what we spoke about. Simply put, Don will make you better and get you thinking about sculpting.


Stream or download below, we are also on Spotify, iTunes, Soundcloud…wherever you get podcasts! Subscribe in your podcatcher to make sure you don’t miss the latest episodes!


In part 2 we spoke to Don about:

– Ego
– Looking for the positives
– Music whilst sculpting
– Using the same tool to get many results
– Sculptures that want to come out
– Deadlines
– Chisel shape tipped rubber clay shapers

Silicone tipped Clay-Shapers

The Kemper D9 that Don refers to as a very versatile tool.

At the time of writing, Don had just finished his workshop in the week leading up to the Prosthetic Event 2018, which was fantastic. His stage spot was rammed, and it was great to see a live audience enraptured, although I shall always cherish this podcast opportunity where just the three of us got to share Don’s space.

Incidentally, Don posts the latest upcoming workshop dates on his Don Lanning’s D3 Studio page. If you can get the chance to go to a class, I’d urge you to do so.

He really is very good at making you better! Those classes fill up fast so check on the latest dates.

The Prosthetics Event 2018 was a magical day!


Thanks again for listening, and if you would like to support us, as ever there is one thing you can do that helps more than anything – tell someone else about the podcast! Share this on social media and tell us how we are doing!

You can email us here direct at stuartandtodd@gmail.com

We appreciate your attention!

– Stuart & Todd


Prosthetics Magazine is THE magazine to check out if you are serious about learning more about making prosthetics.

It only comes out 4 times a year, so each edition is packed with info, tutorials and up to the minute interviews with the folks who are doing this stuff for real!

This latest edition, #13, looks at the creation of the new Mask from Halloween with Christopher Nelson and Vincent Van Dyke.

There is also an article on how a prosthetic appliance was made (and applied with great success) using purely 3D printed moulds. The future is now! https://www.prostheticsmagazine.co.uk/

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Ep #37 – Don Lanning part 1

If you have any sculpting ambition or love for any monster movies made in the last twenty years, then you should know the name, Don Lanning.

Not only is he a gifted craftsman who has worked hard for his place, but he is also a gifted teacher who can help make others better, and he is damn fine fella the whole time he is doing it.

You can stream or download it free here,
or from iTunes, Spotify and wherever you find podcasts.



Don has been working away on productions for years as a hired gun on well know movies such as Hollow Man, Ghosts of Mars, Vanilla Sky, Hellboy, AVP, Silent Hill, The Avengers, and Aquaman as well as TV shows such as The X Files, Nip/Tuck, Star Trek, The Strain, and Bright.

Possibly though, the pivotal moment which brought his method into the limelight was the Stan Winston School For Character Arts videos such as Sculpture Techniques and Character Design.

We weren’t just treated to a ‘how?‘ class, but also a ‘why?‘ class and looking at the feelings on experiences whilst sculpting.

I often think sculpting classes are among the hardest to instruct largely because it is a slow, deliberate act which allows the brain to open up and weep out all the negative things everyone has ever said about you or that you imagined of yourself. It’s all bullshit of course, and it takes someone to help you snap out of it and keep focus.

Don Lannings love of the Wizard of Oz is made real with these series of outstanding character studies. Check out the Facebook page to see more.

Simply put, you CAN do it if you want to. Maybe you feel like you’re not great yet, but if you enjoy doing it then you WILL improve. If that matters to you, then to hell with all the naysaying.

After all, people often say things about themselves that they would never say to another person – and looking at what you can actually do to overcome and improve your shortcomings is what Don does best, especially when you are face to face with the man.

“I was born with no talent whatsoever – I had to fight hard to get everything I got.”

Todd and I took a trip down to his studio to talk with the man himself, and we got into so much dense material, we decided we had to split this one into two parts. In part 1 we talked to Don about:

  • How to actually start sculpting
  • Dealing with a blank canvas
  • Channeling nervous energy
  • Looking for what makes good art
  • Getting better
  • Making the changes for clients
  • Looking for what feels ‘right’
  • Pivotal moments
  • Looking out for scam internships

You’ll also see a love of magic and magic stores crops up again!


Thanks again for listening, and if you would like to support us, as ever there is one thing you can do that helps more than anything – tell someone else about the podcast! Share this on social media and tell us how we are doing!

You can email us here direct at stuartandtodd@gmail.com

We appreciate your attention!

– Stuart & Todd


Prosthetics Magazine is THE magazine to check out if you are serious about learning more about making prosthetics.

It only comes out 4 times a year, so each edition is packed with info, tutorials and up to the minute interviews with the folks who are doing this stuff for real!

This latest edition, #13, looks at the creation of the new Mask from Halloween with Christopher Nelson and Vincent Van Dyke.

There is also an article on how a prosthetic appliance was made (and applied with great success) using purely 3D printed moulds. The future is now! https://www.prostheticsmagazine.co.uk/

 

 

Posted in Interview | Leave a comment

The Monsterpalooza Trailer Chat

After the madness of Monsterpalooza 2018, we had the chance to grab the gang for a wind down chat to debrief about the trip and talk about what we got up to.

It was a fun time, and I hope the warmth of a truly magical few days comes across, as Todd and I were truly humbled at the non-stop kindness and generosity we were liberally soaked with.

Anticlockwise from bottom: Me, Sam Shuck, Adrian Rigby, Eryn Kreuger Mekash and Todd Debreceni hanging out in the magical trailer I stayed in.

Adrian and I met in 1995 when we both travelled out to LA to take a look at the FX scene and see how it worked at the start of what we hoped to be our careers. It was so nice to be back out here 23 years later having been able to have those very careers we so badly wanted.

I think that story needs it’s own post, where we spent the day at Optic Nerve studios, on the set of Babylon 5 watching an episode shoot, and seeing the makeup touch ups happening with Greg Funk and Fionagh Cush working their magic. What a great time we had!

Anyhow, Todd had this cool banner made up to celebrate, and I’m so excited to share the podcast with you.


Click below to stream or download the file. You can subscribe to our podcast, Battles With Bits Of Rubber on iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud and pretty much all podcatcher apps or platforms.


If you want to get in touch with us direct, email stuartandtodd@gmail.com and take a look at our Facebook page.

Until next time, keep it bloody!

Stuart & Todd

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Ep #35 – Steve LaPorte

Steve LaPorte was a joy to speak with. For one thing, he is incredibly talented and has a fantastic body of work.

That aside, he also recalls exactly how he got there and can track back the step by step process of how he got there.

It’s a wonderful thing when someone can trace back their steps and know how they got to where they have and are keen to help others understand what is important.

Listen by streaming or downloading here, or iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Soundcloud etc…



Steve talks about the importance of knowing how to make things work rather than always relying on an endlessly supplied workshop to solve every problem.  Knowing how to pull things together on the spot is a great skill to have on set but ironically is how most people start out when they don’t have a lot of kit.

Hearing who he has worked with is like a who’s who of the makeup effects world. Knowing good, solid makeup skills as well as using appliances and working in a workshop come together to make a very capable artist whose versatile skillset make for a great resume.

We see again and again in these conversations with makeup artists how living a little life first and getting involved in the real world before settling on a career path can be so beneficial, as you can figure out who you are a little clearer before throwing yourself into an industry.

Steve also goes a little into his interest in the circus and particularly clowning, and how learning from the people around you is important. It really helped set him up for working within the film industry and dealing with people and appeal to their better nature.

Clowns nowadays are often seen more as scary tropes, like Pennywise from IT and Killer Clowns From Outer Space. Clowning was designed for fun and joy, to create laughter and cause people to drop their guard and experience joy, and Steve looks at how he wants to  reclaim the clown for laughs rather than screams.

Like he says (Steve credits Leonard Engleman with this maxim), “Retire to something rather than from something.” He is a busy chap, and has plans to bring some very cool things into the business.  Steve has such a pleasant manner and it really was a joy to speak with him. Todd and I were grateful that he gave up his time to chat to us so candidly.

He mentions a book by Wayne W. Dyer – The Shift: Taking Your Life from Ambition to Meaning, and I link it here if you want to check it out.

Many thanks for listening!

Til next time

– Stuart & Todd

 

Posted in Interview | 1 Comment

Ep #34 – Michael Westmore Makeup Man

Michael Westmore has done battle with rubber for a few shows, it’s fair to say.

With a long career spanning every aspect of makeup, he comes from a several generation deep family which practically bleeds greasepaint. Many know of his work on Star Trek, but the breadth of his experience is quite something.

To read more on the subject, check out a brief history of it here, on Wikipedia or track down a copy of ‘The Westmores Of Hollywood‘.



Awared the Academy Award in 1985 for Mask, a moving story of Roy L. “Rocky” Dennis who suffered from Craniodiaphyseal dysplasia, Michael is well placed to comment on extreme prosthetic makeovers to subtle, undetectable straight makeup corrections.

Michael has recently told his own story in ‘Makeup Man‘,  a memoir made up from a collection of stories charting his progression in the industry, and I would recommend it as a great read for anyone with an interest in makeup and how it works within the film industry!

It’s taken 14 years to assemble the stories, going from the 60’s to the 2000’s with loads of extra snippets. It really is a complete work covering the celebrities he worked with and doesn’t shy away from the warts and all experences of a working makeup artist who deals with celebrity skin. A complete reliving of a career!

Todd and I recently had the pleasure of sitting with the man himself at Monsterpalooza 2018, and chatting about:

  • How practice is the key
  • The increase of materials available
  • How to get the best from time at makeup schools
  • The importance of art and art schooling
  • The new adhesives developed by Westmore Effects
  • The amount of available talent now

Michael Westmore Jr was present also, and as the force behind Westmore Effects (check the facebook group) he chatted to us later about the developments coming up and the new exciting materials he has developed to addess the issues those of us who stick rubber onto skin face on set. (Click here for retailer info nearest to you).

We hope you enjoy listening to this one!

Till next time

-Stuart & Todd

 

 

 

Posted in Interview | Leave a comment

Ep #33 – Lenses with Cristina Patterson & Bob Smithson

Contact lenses are pretty easy to find nowadays. It wasn’t always so, and the increased use of lenses has meant an increase in opportunities to have problems with eyes caused by them.



Movies have used lenses for a while, and one of the names which lead the way was Greenspoon. I recall watching the credits of The Lost Boys, and the name ‘Morton K. Greenspoon’ etched itself in my head as those bright yellow vampire lenses really did stand out for me as an excellent example of what a lens can do.

Read more on the history of lenses in this report here at Optometry and Vision Science. Click on the link which says ‘Article As PDF’. If no joy get it here. It is surprising how far back it goes, and the name Greenspoon is there! I was thrilled Cristina mentioned him in the podcast.

Cristina gets busy on The Walking Dead. Those milky eyes and bloodshot orbits are a big part of the grim effects workload.

We chatted to Cristina Patterson of Eye Ink FX about eye care and lenses, especially in the light of many people around us who had created characters for Monsterpalooza using lenses. Many conventions will have extensive makeup characters with lenses bought online or in costume stores for not a lot of money. These lenses may be available in stores, but is it wise to buy and use them?

We drill deep and talk about the things that matter with eyecare and lenses, with a mind to the professional makeup artist who may be pressured into supplying and fitting lenses as an afterthought or as a cheap alternative to using a lens tech.

We also chatted to Bob Smithson, a lens tech with many years experience fitting lenses on set and dealing with the front line of lenses on a production.

Bob drops some magic into the eyes of Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl as The Devil for the Tenacious D video ‘The Pick Of Destiny’.

The bottom line is there are risks whenever you put something into the eye, and it pays to know the lenses are from a legal and reputable supplier and that whoever fits them is qualified and insured to do so.

It’s an expensive thing to get wrong!

I’m aware that of course it is beyong most casual budgets to pay to have lenses specially made and fitted, but that doesn’t mean problems you may encounter from ill fitting or bad lenses will be any cheaper for finances or reputations. Of course corners are cut and if you are taking chances with your own eyes then it’s on you. I guess what I am saying is that you must not take that route if working on someone elses eyes. Especially if they can sue you.

Stay Tuned! More to come.

– Stuart & Todd

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Ep #32 – Allan Apone & Brad Look Respect The Craft!

Todd and I had a great morning chatting with Allan A. Apone and Brad Look at MEL headquarters (Makeup Effects Lab) based up in North Hollywood.

MEL now occupies a huge area of workshops and produces effects for shows as well as products used by artists in the industry, including PAX paints, baldcaps and appliances. Starting out as a small lab in 1978, it now boasts some 18000 square feet of facility.

Their website is MEL Products USA and is worth checking out!

Our tour took us from machine shop to foam room, silicone lab and woodshop, all surrounded by a million artefacts from jobs in the past.

We sat and talked about the recent Monsterpalooza weekend, as well as the business of makeup and what really counts. As seasoned makeup artists with many years experience on set, Allan and Brad made this episode of the podcast a gold-loaded listen for makeup artists.

Like Brad says, “If you don’t know highlight and shadow, it doesn’t matter what you are putting on – it won’t look right!“. Despite the noise of competing companies vying for our attention and wallets, this really is the key message. Know your subject, know yourself and above all, respect the craft!

Incidentally, MEL have a podcast called ‘This Week In Makeup‘ which is worth checking out!


Click below to stream or download the file. You can subscribe to our podcast, Battles With Bits Of Rubber on iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud and pretty much all podcatcher apps or platforms.

 

If you dig this, please share it with someone you think would like it and throw it up on social media! Email us direct at stuartandtodd@gmail.com and on our facebook page.

Till next time!

-Stuart & Todd

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment